The Pun Pundit

The Pun Pundit

Sanding Party #Back2Bates #Seniors2015

Sanding Party #Back2Bates #Seniors2015

You know you’re affected by stress easily when you have nightmares about CozyCat Rentals because they’re coming to move in your bed today.

Gettin #Gritty with the parents 
#Back2Bates

Gettin #Gritty with the parents
#Back2Bates

Codependency isn’t sexy. It isn’t romantic. It’s built with a fuse and will surely burn out. The healthiest thing you can say to the one you love is, “I would be okay without you, and that’s why I choose to stay.”

LB, A Few Things About Love (via lilgivenchyprincess)

(via theuniversalthump)

thedaintysquid:

(via a home full of curiosities | The Dainty Squid)
thedaintysquid:

(via a home full of curiosities | The Dainty Squid)
thedaintysquid:

(via a home full of curiosities | The Dainty Squid)
thedaintysquid:

(via a home full of curiosities | The Dainty Squid)
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka
pineconeonthetent:

<3:
photographer » Vivian Fu
blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen
stick & poke artist » MISO
artist » Tammy Rae Carland
photographer » Kotori Kawashima
photographer » Yael Malka

pineconeonthetent:

<3:

photographer » Vivian Fu

blog » Witchin’ in the Kitchen

stick & poke artist » MISO

artist » Tammy Rae Carland

photographer » Kotori Kawashima

photographer » Yael Malka

jonahryan:

i love botticelli because all of the women in his paintings constantly look like they’re silently contemplating how much they hate everyone around them

image

"tell me more about your opinions on high-waisted shorts"

image

"no, really, i love family guy"

image

"i can’t even look at these fucking idiots"

image

"i hate this baby"

image

"misandry"

Most definitely said this to Jack in Florence. I also added that all paintings of Mother Mary, no matter who the artist is, have Mother Mary looking either completely bored or extremely tired of your shit. Mother Mary is not having any of it.

mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.
mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.
mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.
mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.
mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.

mirnah:

Raffaele, architect, his wife Francesca and their 2 children live in this italian home. Their main challenge was to remove the “unnecessary” elements and previous additions made to the house and leave the majestic lines and original walls speak for themselves. Tough design exercise, brilliantly executed.

(via theshinysquirrel)

oszt:

       iraffiruse:

Long exposure, 3 traffic lights in the fog.

damn this justthis fukn does it for methis is gorgeous

oszt:

       iraffiruse:

Long exposure, 3 traffic lights in the fog.

damn this just
this fukn does it for me
this is gorgeous

(via youbroketheinternet)

#tbt to a day in #Florence because today is filled with only hours and hours of travel. #SelfiesInEurope
#Back2Bates

#tbt to a day in #Florence because today is filled with only hours and hours of travel. #SelfiesInEurope
#Back2Bates

lavenderlavia:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”

lavenderlavia:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

(via yvonensadultsleepover)

#Switzerland

#Switzerland

Sometimes you just have to climb out of fortress windows for better views in #Naples 
 (at Castel Sant&#8217;Elmo)

Sometimes you just have to climb out of fortress windows for better views in #Naples 
 (at Castel Sant’Elmo)

#SelfiesInEurope in #Naples

#SelfiesInEurope in #Naples

I was 17 when I wrote that,” she reminds me. “That’s the age you are when you think someone can actually take your boyfriend. Then you grow up and realise no one takes someone from you if they don’t want to leave.

Taylor talking about Better Than Revenge (x)

(via yvonensadultsleepover)